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Nortis Awarded $688K for NIH Phase II SBIR Fast Track Grant in Human Blood Brain Barrier Model

Posted by Christopher Smoke on

SEATTLE, Aug. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Nortis today announced the awarding of a $688K National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant. The award will provide funding for the third year of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Fast-track grant under award number R44NS095585 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).  

The neurotherapeutics sector is among the largest and fastest growing markets in the pharmaceutical industry. Progress has been slow due to the lack of in-vitro assays that reliably predict outcomes in humans. The grant will allow Nortis to expand applications for its proprietary ParVivo™ system into the field of human blood-brain barrier (BBB), addressing the critically unmet need for more effective in-vitro testing systems that model human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, stroke and cancer. 

"Understanding how drugs are transported across the blood-brain barrier and interact with the brain presents a significant scientific challenge," said Dr. Thomas Neumann, CEO of Nortis and Principal Investigator on this project. "More predictive preclinical models based on human tissue are urgently needed to reduce costs and minimize clinical trial failures. This grant will help us develop new in-vitro alternatives to traditional pharmaceutical drug development testing on laboratory animals. " 

About Nortis   
Nortis is a privately held Organs-on-Chip company that is revolutionizing traditional drug development and discovery processes. The company is a leader in the 70% CAGR Organs-on-Chip market, projected by Research and Markets to reach $1.3B by 2022. Nortis has more than 30 customers using its systems, including biopharma leaders and top academic centers like the University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). For more information about Nortis visit www.nortisbio.com.

About ParVivo  
The ParVivo system provides organizations with the ability to accurately investigate living 3D models of human organs and accelerate the discovery and introduction of new therapies into the market. The in-vitro alternative to today's laboratory animal testing models accurately replicates the biological structure and function of living human organs with the aim of reducing clinical trial failures. Organ models currently under development by scientists and application developers using ParVivo include applications for kidney, brain, heart, liver, immune system, blood vessels, cancer and personalized medicine.

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Nortis will be at 3D Tissue Models Summit 2017, Boston, MA

Posted by Christopher Smoke on

If you will be at 3D Tissue Models Summit, August 28th - 30st 2017, come listen to a presentation by Science Director, Dr. Henning Mann, to learn more about our Organ-on-Chip products and solutions. If you will be in the area, email Chris@nortisbio.com to set up a meeting.

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Sigma Sponsored Webinar with Ed Kelly (UW) and Nortis on Nephrotoxicity

Posted by Christopher Smoke on

3D Nephrotoxicity applications & Nortis' microfluidic organ-on-chip technology

Webinar Link

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Functional Coupling of Human Microphysiology Systems: Intestine, Liver, Kidney Proximal Tubule, Blood-Brain Barrier and Skeletal Muscle.

Posted by Matthew Hayes on

Abstract

Organ interactions resulting from drug, metabolite or xenobiotic transport between organs are key components of human metabolism that impact therapeutic action and toxic side effects. Preclinical animal testing often fails to predict adverse outcomes arising from sequential, multi-organ metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics. Human microphysiological systems (MPS) can model these interactions and are predicted to dramatically improve the efficiency of the drug development process. In this study, five human MPS models were evaluated for functional coupling, defined as the determination of organ interactions via an in vivo-like sequential, organ-to-organ transfer of media. MPS models representing the major absorption, metabolism and clearance organs (the jejunum, liver and kidney) were evaluated, along with skeletal muscle and neurovascular models. Three compounds were evaluated for organ-specific processing: terfenadine for pharmacokinetics (PK) and toxicity; trimethylamine (TMA) as a potentially toxic microbiome metabolite; and vitamin D3. We show that the organ-specific processing of these compounds was consistent with clinical data, and discovered that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) crosses the blood-brain barrier. These studies demonstrate the potential of human MPS for multi-organ toxicity and absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME), provide guidance for physically coupling MPS, and offer an approach to coupling MPS with distinct media and perfusion requirements.

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Liver and Kidney on Chips: Microphysiological Models to Understand Transporter Function.

Posted by Matthew Hayes on

Abstract

Because of complex cellular microenvironments of both the liver and kidneys, accurate modeling of transport function has remained a challenge, leaving a dire need for models that can faithfully recapitulate both the architecture and cell-cell interactions observed in vivo. The study of hepatic and renal transport function is a fundamental component of understanding the metabolic fate of drugs and xenobiotics; however, there are few in vitro systems conducive for these types of studies. For both the hepatic and renal systems, we provide an overview of the location and function of the most significant phase I/II/III (transporter) of enzymes, and then review current in vitro systems for the suitability of a transporter function study and provide details on microphysiological systems that lead the field in these investigations. Microphysiological modeling of the liver and kidneys using "organ-on-a-chip" technologies is rapidly advancing in transport function assessment and has emerged as a promising method to evaluate drug and xenobiotic metabolism. Future directions for the field are also discussed along with technical challenges encountered in complex multiple-organs-on-chips development.

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